How our brain controls movement and makes new connections when parts are damaged

  Having voluntary control over body movements is the only way we can interact with people, objects and our environment. Body movement is not just about controlling arms and legs; it’s also for our head and eyes to visually explore the world, for our facial expressions to show emotion, and for articulation of our lips, tongue and mouth to communicate. The devastating effects of the brain losing its ability to control body movements are seen in motor neuron disease – where progressive degeneration and muscle wasting leads to some patients becoming “locked-in”, meaning they can’t move or communicate in any…
View More/Source Article